Lemmy_2

Lemmy Has Left The Building

The first Steel City Rocks blog post pays homage to the legendary hell-raiser and king of loud rock. 

The rock world is in shock after Lemmy Kilmister’s sad and unexpected passing just four days after his 70th birthday on Christmas Eve. Never before have we seen such an overwhelming outpouring of tributes and testimonials – each filled with love and complete respect – from rock fans worldwide. And rightly so. Bona-fide badass and kind-hearted gent in equal measure, Lemmy is perhaps our beloved genre’s most significant loss. In recent years – faced with a music industry in decline – Motörhead’s music had almost become secondary, with their unwavering championing of rock rebellion proving to be the crown jewel of their forty-year career. An advert for hedonism and excess, Lemmy was the living, breathing embodiment of rock ‘n’ roll; and the purveyor of an authentic, maverick attitude that we are seldom exposed to in the 21st century. After all, Lemmy often reminded us that he was literally unqualified to spend his time doing anything other than sex, drugs and rock n’ roll. This was a man who – upon discovering he was diabetic – reluctantly gave up his long-time poison of JD & Coke in favour of vodka and orange, as he genuinely believed the latter was a healthier option. Lemmy lived life on his own terms until the very end; and in the process taught us all to do the same, while raising a middle finger to anyone who tries to tell us otherwise. He would surely cackle in that familiar, gravelly voice and call us romantic fools if he could read any one of our misty-eyed eulogies. As such, we should not mourn Sir Kilmister for a single moment, and instead, celebrate the life of a genuine rock icon who will continue to be an inspiration for generations to come. Raise a glass of Jack and treat your neighbours to some Overkill. While the man may have succumbed to mortality, Motörhead’s punk-metal infused anthems of defiance and debauchery will remain immortal forever. His name was Lemmy, and he was rock ‘n’ roll.




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